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Episode 10: Resources

Episode ten of borrowed solace: the podcast features story time with Eowyn Randall. Eowyn Randall has an MFA in creative writing from the University of Pittsburgh, a city she discovered she loved while spending a year traveling North America by bus and reading the stories of other journeys. She still lives, writes, and reads there. Particularly interested in genres, she’s constantly looking for new ways to blur the boundaries between them. Her work has appeared in A Lonely Riot & borrowed solace.

As always, we want to hear from you! It’s almost Thanksgiving, so imagine we are gathered for a borrowed solace friendsgiving, and share what you think about this episode in the comments below!

Episode 10: A Block of Lard

This episode of the podcast I am joined by Amber and a special guest who was published in borrowed solace issue 1.2. Tune in to hear Eowyn Randall read her story, “A Block of Lard,” on this episode of the podcast!

A Writing Update

Hi writing folks!

This week has been terrible for me as I have a horrible cold and I am going through training classes with my puppy! We only lasted three classes and then we were kicked out. German Shepherds are known to bark, and my boy has a deep and super loud bark. Too much for the trainers there to handle. Nothing stops him from barking, so here I go finding another place who can help. So with that being said, to calm myself, I have been writing. I am pretty steady at 1,000 words a day, which they recommend 1,600 a day to stay on top. So, some days I go over, and some I am under. Right now I am at 14,000 words.

I have been working on this novel. I started with the idea from a short story in college, a story that most of my classmates thought was a part of novel when it wasn’t back then…not yet. But the writing idea I had was to imagine if one day you woke up with your grandmother by your side telling you to take over the family business…the business of being a grim reaper. I actually got ripped apart for that story in class, so I came back with a different version of how to become a grim reaper. I am nineteen chapters in and I am so ready for the novel to be written and over.

My tip (and struggle) is to keep writing, you can always edit later. Only stop to fix corrections of words from typing fast—because those pesky red lines are so distracting—but keep going. Just get it on paper. Get it done. You can do it.

And here’s a photo of Thunder because having him close helps too! He is as black as Grim.

So now a bit from Addey on how she has been making out (spoiler from Addey–it’s nowhere near as good as Nicole has been doing!)

Nicole challenged me to also try to write this month.  I’ve been a bit overwhelmed with lots of random other things on my to do list, so writing has fallen to the wayside a bit, but the idea of so many others around the world using November as their excuse to write like crazy has inspired me to at least try to write more for this month—even if it’s not 1,000 words a day.

I have also been working on an idea for a novel that I have written and re-written again and again.  It’s an idea that came from a German movie I watched in a class in college.  It’s a source of pretty random inspiration, but so far everyone I have talked to about the plot line and story idea think it’s a great idea, and something unique.  That’s part of the battle in and of itself when it comes to writing—getting the idea just perfect—so I am rolling with it.

My issue was that when I have had the first several chapters critiqued I have been told time and time again that the beginning just wasn’t grabbing the reader.  I didn’t have a good beginning.  So I think I was putting off working on the idea anymore because I didn’t know where to start.  But I decided to tackle a new beginning—to start of a chapter or two into what I had before.  It meant cutting out a lot of already written work, but the book will be better because of it.  I think I’ve come up with a killer first line, too, if I do say so myself.

So that’s where I’m at.  Only a few chapters into my new version of the same idea, but better off than I was in October.

Are you taking on NaNoWriMo to the full extent like Nicole, or using it as inspiration to set aside more time for writing without an end goal in mind like Addey?  Let us know by commenting below!

Episode 9: Resources

On episode nine of borrowed solace: the podcast, the other editors and I discussed how the journal has morphed into what it is today, and all the growing pains that came along with the may changes that have taken place over the last few years.

Unlike our usual resources posts, we don’t have much in the way of information and external links to share, but we would still love to hear from you! Imagine we’re all sorting through Halloween candy, and remarking on how crazy it is that it’s already November, when the conversation turns to this week’s podcast. Let us know what you think and comment below!

Jump On Board for NaNoWriMo!

As most writers know, November is a special month because of NaNoWriMo, otherwise known as National Novel Writing Month. We here at borrowed solace do not accept novels, but have in the past accepted excerpts that were not used in novels, but came from one.

So what is this challenge? Basically, you have to write 50,000 words towards a novel (or complete a novel) or large writing project within 30 days. But why can’t this be a collection of short stories, novellas, and poems that make up 50,000 words like our very own journal?! It’s up to you!

So our challenge to you, as some of us editors will participate in this challenge as well, is to write 50,000 words–whether it actually ends up as a novel you have always wanted to write, a memoir, a journal, a chapbook, or a collection of short fictional or nonfiction stories is up to you. Writing is hard when you have a full-time job, school, life, pets, family, friends, clubs, groups, and so much more, so here are a few tips from us editors on what we do for this challenge:

Tip #1: Get organized.

First, know what you are going to do, how you are going to do it, and when you are going to do it. The where and why really don’t matter right now. Some people can write anywhere and some people have a designated writing spot and most writers just like to write. So, are you going to write a brand new novel, finish a novel left hanging in your literary closet of unfinished ideas, or a collection of stories or poems? Once you decide on what, then you can address the how–meaning, how are you going to piece it together? Are you going to write in order of the chapters, write a bunch and then piece together how the stories or poem should follow each other? You need to figure out where to start off from if you are completing a novel. Make an outline, or an agenda day by day if you are a planner like me. I think the biggest challenge for me is finding the time to sit down and actually write!

Tip #2: Set goals you can achieve every day.

The purpose of the challenge is to write—not edit. To put words down on paper to total 50,000. It may seem like a lot, especially to achieve in 30 days, but managing what you can do in a day can really help. Maybe take a few days to plan and devise an attack, then write and keep track of how many words you can write in a day. Some people are fast writers and some are really slow…like me. I write slow, it takes a full day to write two chapters for me.

Tip #3: Get it done!

No excuses, no distractions—except for research or world developing–and no hesitation. For some writers we hesitate to write because we may not have inspiration. Not having any inspiration is not a good excuse, procrastination is not an excuse (though very real), and not being good enough is definitely not an excuse (we’ve all been there, full of doubt). Wing it or plan out a strategy, but know that you can write 50,000 words in a month…in 30 days, and it can be awesome!

Tip #4: Don’t stop.

When you are tired, unfocused, and unsure where to go, just step back, look at what you already completed, and keep going. Most writers won’t challenge themselves with this opportunity, but a lot do. Be the one who doesn’t stop and can complete an amazing project that not a lot of writers can actually complete.

Tip #5: Don’t hesitate to step out into the community.

During this month, awareness of writing spreads, so a lot of people are writing! Don’t be afraid to reach out, talk, and interact with people doing this challenge, especially us here at borrowed solace. You can comment on this blog if you ever need a hand in this challenge, because we editors are struggling too.

We are writers, storm and tide makers, playing the dramatist on stage, the quirky fashion designer tailoring our words, and we are the humans willing to jump into the sea to see what kind hurricane we can create. So don’t be afraid—jump with us!

An Update to Our Masthead

As many of you know, Nicole Taylor went on a hiatus for the Fall 2019 journal. Nicole Taylor was our nonfiction editor and a founder of borrowed solace. She recently decided, after many long and tough considerations, to permanently step away from the journal. We loved having her aboard our ship sailing in these mighty waters with us for the past two years. We wish her success finding all the gold hidden in sunken pirate ships and we know she will watch out for us from a distant lighthouse.

Going forward and into our future, I, Nicole McConnell, your executive editor, will be taking on Nicole Taylor’s role. I will be completing all of her duties in reading nonfiction submissions, selecting finalists, and editing final selections. So please bear with me as I learn her role even more. I am excited to fully embrace this role and can’t wait to see what people submit for nonfiction again this time around.
As for art…Addey (poetry) and Amber (fiction) and I are currently deciding how we want to move forward with art. For this journal, we will be using art as our main cover as we always do, and art for the cover pages of each section.

Please stay tuned for the next announcement, as we also are excited to announce we are finally on our way towards print. So watch for those announcements as well!

Sincerely,

Nicole McConnell

Episode 8: Resources

On episode eight of borrowed solace: the podcast, the editors discussed how we went from the Writer’s Guild–a student led club on a college campus–to borrowed solace. Check out some resources for more information below:

How To Start Your Own Literary Journal (And Why You Want To!)

So You Want To Start Your Own On-Line Literary Journal. . .

We want to hear what you think about this episode! Please comment below and join the discussion. Pretend we are carving pumpkins and watching Halloween movies while chatting about the podcast, and leave your thoughts below!

Episode 8: From Writer’s Guild to borrowed solace

This week on the podcast we continue on with our origins mini-series and discuss how we transitioned from the Writer’s Guild (which you can hear more about by listening to episode seven) to borrowed solace. Thanks for tuning in!

All About Submissions for Issue 3.1

If you’re thinking “Wow, they’re open for submissions already?  The fall issue just came out!” Then you would be right.  We’re thinking the same thing. But such is the life of a journal, and we can’t wait to start reading submissions for issue 3.1, which is un-themed and will come out in spring 2020.  That’s right—2020!

To get your creative juices flowing and give you at least a little bit of insight into what we are looking for, each of the editors has shared a quick summary below of what they hope to read in submissions for issue 3.1!

Fiction:

I’m looking for creative and gripping tales that will haunt the confines of my thoughts. 

Art: 

We are trying something different for art! For this next issue, there will not be an art section, but instead you can submit your art to be featured on our front and back cover! Any type of art can be submitted, though truly unique pieces that play with colors and shock us with how beautiful this world can be, and what people can create, is what will get you accepted.

Nonfiction:

True stories work when two things happen: they keep you wondering how the story is going to end and they make you think or feel (or both.) I want to read stories that have both of these things and that keep my attention to the end, spark my sense of wondering if the tale is real, and strike a place of sympathy—let me know how much the story wants me to care. Bring on the truth! 

Poetry:

With any un-themed issue, I’m never quite sure what I’m looking for.  With un-themed editions there really are no rules, which is what makes them exciting.  As always, I’m looking for work that is exciting to read.  Work that twists and turns as I read each word, and work that plays with the absurdity that language can be.  Give me your crazy poems, your somber poems, your sappy love poems, but make sure that there’s something unexpected contained within the lines on the page.

We hope this helps get you started—we can’t wait to read what you submit.  Happy writing!